Latest News

Springbok shank with textures of sweet potato and minty herb salsa


Recipe f or Springbok shank with textures of sweet potato and minty herb salsa. The shanks ingredients oil for frying […]

Sweet Potato Soup with Springbok Biltong


Recipe for Sweet Potato Soup with Springbok Biltong Sweet potato soup ingredients 2 large purple sweet potatoes, washed, peeled and […]

#MocktailMonday Natura Nojito


Natura Nojito Ingredients 10 – 12 fresh mint sprigs 1 lime 15 ml simple syrup 180 ml Leopard’s Leap Natura […]

#MocktailMonday Orange Oasis


Orange Oasis Serves 1 Ingredients 15 ml pineapple juice 45 ml orange juice 30 ml freshly squeezed lime juice 60 […]

#MocktailMonday Star Lite


Star Lite Ingredients 500 ml Barker and Quinn light tonic 500 ml Leopard’s Leap Natura De-Alcoholised Classic White 500 ml […]

#MocktailMonday Sugar, spice and all things nice!


We will always love a glass of wine to cheer up a Monday, but there are times and occasions when […]

Green Vegan Burgers with Avocado Mayo


Making responsible lifestyle choices is commendable, but it is not always that easy. What happens to Burger night when you […]

Vegan Tomato and Roasted Mediterranean Vegetable Risotto


Risotto is comfort food at its best. And while it is usually meat-free, the butter and Parmesan cheese keep it […]

Vegan Fettuccine Bolognese


Being more responsible in your food choices, does not mean you have to forgo traditional favourites such as Spaghetti Bolognese. […]

Vegan Red Lentil Soup


Contrary to popular belief, a warming winter soup does not need marrow bones! You can warm up just as nicely with […]

Wine culture in 121 B.C. much like today



5146587805_387bf3b263_b
Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius was reportedly one of few who was not a fan of Falernian wine. Image by mbell1975 via Compfight.

An interesting new article on www.winespectator.com says that 'ample evidence exists that ancient Rome had a fine wine culture much like today’s, with prestige regions, cult wines and a love of bold, rich styles meant to be aged for decades.'

The 'cult' wine from this period, the one everyone sought to drink, was Falernian wine.Probably a varietal wine made from a grape the Romans called Aminea Gemina, Falernian was grown in three vineyards on the slopes of Mt. Massico. Falernian from 121 B.C. (the vintage of a lifetime!) was celebrated for decades; multiple ancient sources mention having the chance to taste the wine 200 years after its vintage date. (Writing in the first century, Pliny the Elder acknowledges that the wine was a bit past its peak by then.) 

The article further states: 'As Falernian became a byword for luxury, inevitably, the demand for it spurred spurious “Falernians” into the market, another ancient practice still alive today. On one tavern wall preserved at Pompeii, the wine list can be seen: “For one as [a unit of currency; a loaf of bread cost two] you can drink wine; for two, you can drink the best; for four, you can drink Falernian.”'

Wine historians today believe this famed wine could have been either white or red, and that it was fermented to 15 or 16 percent alcohol and diluted with water. 

Upcoming Events

Buy Our Wines

Take a look at our wine collection. CLICK HERE

Ask Us

Feel free to contact us.
CLICK HERE



    Newsletter Sign-up


    © Copyright 2019 Leopard's Leap | Terms & Conditions | Privacy Policy | Delivery Policy | Refund Policy

    Ask Us

    [contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]